Quote of the Week

I've been collecting quotes from books for years now and figure it's high time I put them to use. So here is the quote of the week: "If you look down and are not frightened of heights (the Society for the Preservation of This and That have put up some excellent railings to preserve you … Continue reading Quote of the Week

Quote of the Week

I've been collecting quotes from books for years now and figure it's high time I put them to use. So here is the quote of the week:   "Human speech is like a cracked tin kettle, on which we hammer out tunes to make bears dance when we long to move the stars." Gustave Flaubert, Madame … Continue reading Quote of the Week

4 Ways to Make a Scene Matter

In writing, we're told to "kill our darlings" and get rid of the bits of writing we love if they don't serve the story. But what if we could those little scenes and transform them into something useful, incorporating the elements that are near and dear to our heart with the plot? It won't always … Continue reading 4 Ways to Make a Scene Matter

The Secret Schedules of Great Authors

As I writer, I'm always curious about how other writers write. And much of what I've read on this subject is daunting: write every day, write even when you don't feel like it, write first thing in the morning when your energies are at their peak, etc. Hemingway was a great proponent of early morning … Continue reading The Secret Schedules of Great Authors

Flashback Friday: An Argument for Children to Read Fairy Tales and Fantasy

As part of the ongoing Flashback Friday series, here is a post whose content originally appeared in June 2014. G. K. Chesterton wrote about a great many matters, including fairy tales, and I’m not going to try to capture the entirety of his thoughts on the subject. However, three of his essays present some very … Continue reading Flashback Friday: An Argument for Children to Read Fairy Tales and Fantasy

Celebrating C. S. Lewis’ Quotes

In honor of "Jack's" birthday, I figure it's only fitting to share some of his quotes. So here are a few of my favorites: “Yes, it is strange that anyone should dislike cats. But cats themselves are the worst offenders in this respect. They very seldom seem to like one another.” "It is a serious thing to … Continue reading Celebrating C. S. Lewis’ Quotes

Tolkien and Lewis: Pantster vs. Plotter

If you do an online search for "pantsters" and "plotters," you'll find that a great deal has been said about writing techniques and the pros and cons of being a pantster--one who writes by the seat of one's pants--and being a plotter who charts everything ahead of time. And personally, being a pantster, I've felt … Continue reading Tolkien and Lewis: Pantster vs. Plotter

C. S. Lewis’ Philosophy of Writing

Earlier this week, we looked at C. S. Lewis' thoughts on Christianity and Culture, which discusses his philosophy of writing--why he wrote what he wrote. He felt that "The abuse of culture is already there, and will continue whether Christians cease to be cultured or not. It is therefore probably better that the ranks of the ‘culture-sellers’ should include … Continue reading C. S. Lewis’ Philosophy of Writing

C. S. Lewis in Defense of Culture and His Vocation

I wanted to spend some time looking at Christian engagement in culture and the arts, and naturally, I turned to C. S. Lewis to see what he might have to say on the matter. In his article, "Christianity and Culture," he explores whether Christians ought to be involved in producing culture in the first place. In response … Continue reading C. S. Lewis in Defense of Culture and His Vocation

What Writing Can Tell Us About God

It sounds audacious, but it is largely the premise of Dorothy L. Sayers' The Mind of the Maker. Because writers, like other artists, are "sub-creators," they can give us a unique perspective on the Creator Himself, which can simplify questions of how one can make good and evil, and how miracle, free will, and the Trinity might … Continue reading What Writing Can Tell Us About God