Jane Austen and Christianity, Part One

I have long considered Jane Austen to be one of the better Christian authors. She doesn't preach conversion, brimstone and damnation, yet she reaffirms Christian doctrine quietly, through her characters and stories. They may be a product of her own beliefs or of the overall Christian tenor of her society, but the messages are there. … Continue reading Jane Austen and Christianity, Part One

What Does It Mean to Write about Happiness?

A few weeks ago I came across a review on Goodreads mentioning Laurie Colwin and how, in that reader's opinion, she was one of the few recent authors who wrote about happiness. My curiosity piqued, I ordered one of her novels, Happy All the Time, through my local library, and I let myself entertain modest … Continue reading What Does It Mean to Write about Happiness?

Stories within Stories

Last Friday, we looked at how we can use material from other stories in our own, and today, I want to look at an example, as examined by A Pilgrim in Narnia, where Brenton Dickieson highlighted some of the “stories,” or sources, of Pride and Prejudice in a recent post, some of which were quite … Continue reading Stories within Stories

Broken Promises and Dancing Down the Aisle

I’ve been doing a lot of research on weddings lately (since my current novel has one in it), and I encountered a most interesting phenomenon: dancing down the aisle. When I first heard it I thought, a dance for a recessional? Sounds like fun! The wedding is over, the celebration begins, and what better way … Continue reading Broken Promises and Dancing Down the Aisle

Writing that Scene: Pride and Prejudice

In the format of a non-traditional critique, Writing that Scene examines the fundamentals of what it takes to capably convey a scene to one’s readers. The opinion expressed is my own, and other readers’ opinions may and will differ. If you are interested in sharing a scene of your own for a future post, click … Continue reading Writing that Scene: Pride and Prejudice

Isn’t It Climactic? The Structure of Stories

We tend to look for high points in our lives, and especially in our stories: things that tell us life is moving forward, going somewhere…and that we can’t go back. Events that tell us things have changed, preferably for better—and these events are climaxes. I think writers tend to obsess over climaxes: are we building … Continue reading Isn’t It Climactic? The Structure of Stories

Rediscovering Jane: A Comparison

I recently finished the first book of Fanny Burney’s three volume novel Cecilia. As Burney is an author who supposedly influenced Jane Austen, I was curious to compare her work with that of Austen, and I particularly wanted to read Cecilia because the title for Pride and Prejudice supposedly comes from a speech one of … Continue reading Rediscovering Jane: A Comparison