Why I Don’t Often Re-Read Fantasy

I read a lot of fantasy novels. Of the books I read, that genre and the classics (usually things written before the 20th century) are the most read, but I've noticed that I don't reread fantasy that much. I think about it. I plan to reread it. I own the books in question. But I … Continue reading Why I Don’t Often Re-Read Fantasy

What Book Coaching Can Do For You

Have you ever been writing along and wished you could find out if your description made sense? If it was too wordy or uninformative? If your dialogue was true to character, your novel the right length, the plot coherent? Such questions are not the sign that one is a "bad writer," for even good writers … Continue reading What Book Coaching Can Do For You

Flashback Friday: How Dark Should Fairy Tales Be?

As part of the ongoing Flashback Friday series, we're featuring posts from the archives. This was original posted in May 2014. Lately, an ever-darkening series of fairy tale reincarnations have flit their way across the silver screen, from Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters to Snow White and the Huntsman and Disney's Maleficent. Of course, there … Continue reading Flashback Friday: How Dark Should Fairy Tales Be?

Flashback Friday: What Stories Should We Read?

As part of the ongoing "Flashback Friday" series, I am reposting content from this blog's archives. An article on this subject was originally posted in May 2014. It seems that, in general, the stories that get read the most are those that manage to get a number of people talking about a book, or those … Continue reading Flashback Friday: What Stories Should We Read?

Flashback Friday – What Makes an Original Work “Yours”?

For the first of my Flashback Friday series, I wanted to reprint a post from May 2014 on copyright and artists' compensation. In our world, we are bombarded with copyright notices, whether through the unavoidable segment of DVDs where we are told that piracy is not a victimless crime, in familiar, tiny images like ©, … Continue reading Flashback Friday – What Makes an Original Work “Yours”?

Diversity in Fiction

Jamie Lampeyrolerie is having a great series on Diversity in Christian Fiction over on Books and Beverages, and the recent post really sums up some of the thoughts I've struggled with. Her last post featured Amy Green, a fiction publicist from Bethany House, and she dove into the discussion, heart and mind. One of the … Continue reading Diversity in Fiction

Celebrating C. S. Lewis’ Quotes

In honor of "Jack's" birthday, I figure it's only fitting to share some of his quotes. So here are a few of my favorites: “Yes, it is strange that anyone should dislike cats. But cats themselves are the worst offenders in this respect. They very seldom seem to like one another.” "It is a serious thing to … Continue reading Celebrating C. S. Lewis’ Quotes

Fictional Families: Mothers and Daughters

We've been exploring positive literary families, covering Fathers and Sons and Fathers and Daughters, and today, I wanted to start looking at the Mothering side of the equation. We've all read lots and lots of bad mothers, step-mothers, and dead mothers; most fairy tales have at least of these as the villain or story device … Continue reading Fictional Families: Mothers and Daughters

Book Review: After Avalon

Book Description from Goodreads: King Arthur is dead. Camelot has fallen. Britain drowns in Saxons. These are the stories of what came after.  Merlin’s prophecies begin such, in introduction:  “In the days when Arthur’s dream was dimmed, as grey embers under storm, actors from our reverie still ventured forth. A boy enters decaying Broceliande with the … Continue reading Book Review: After Avalon

Describing a Memorable Character: Miss Havisham

Well, is later than I planned, but it is still the 30th of October, (PST), so I'm going to finish my posts for "Characters in Costume." And next blogfest, I won't arrange a birthday party for one of the days of the event. 🙂 We looked at the minimalist and medium approaches to describing s … Continue reading Describing a Memorable Character: Miss Havisham