Flashback Friday: An Argument for Children to Read Fairy Tales and Fantasy

As part of the ongoing Flashback Friday series, here is a post whose content originally appeared in June 2014. G. K. Chesterton wrote about a great many matters, including fairy tales, and I’m not going to try to capture the entirety of his thoughts on the subject. However, three of his essays present some very … Continue reading Flashback Friday: An Argument for Children to Read Fairy Tales and Fantasy

Flashback Friday: An Obscure Fairy Tale with a Modern Twist

Continuing the Flashback Friday series, this post was originally written in June 2014. I  came across Madame d’Aulnoy’s “Graciosa and Percinet” a few months back, when I was reading Phantastes and looking up the various fairy tales mentioned in the course of the book (it can be found in Andrew Lang’s “The Red Fairy Book” as a free … Continue reading Flashback Friday: An Obscure Fairy Tale with a Modern Twist

What Kind of God is in Your Christian Fiction?

For most authors, this may sound like a silly question. If they're Christian, then of course they're featuring the God of the Bible, the Father who sent His Son into the world. There is only one God they could possible feature in their writing...right? Well, not exactly. I just read three different novels that I … Continue reading What Kind of God is in Your Christian Fiction?

Celebrating C. S. Lewis’ Quotes

In honor of "Jack's" birthday, I figure it's only fitting to share some of his quotes. So here are a few of my favorites: “Yes, it is strange that anyone should dislike cats. But cats themselves are the worst offenders in this respect. They very seldom seem to like one another.” "It is a serious thing to … Continue reading Celebrating C. S. Lewis’ Quotes

Tolkien and Lewis: Pantster vs. Plotter

If you do an online search for "pantsters" and "plotters," you'll find that a great deal has been said about writing techniques and the pros and cons of being a pantster--one who writes by the seat of one's pants--and being a plotter who charts everything ahead of time. And personally, being a pantster, I've felt … Continue reading Tolkien and Lewis: Pantster vs. Plotter

C. S. Lewis’ Philosophy of Writing

Earlier this week, we looked at C. S. Lewis' thoughts on Christianity and Culture, which discusses his philosophy of writing--why he wrote what he wrote. He felt that "The abuse of culture is already there, and will continue whether Christians cease to be cultured or not. It is therefore probably better that the ranks of the ‘culture-sellers’ should include … Continue reading C. S. Lewis’ Philosophy of Writing

C. S. Lewis in Defense of Culture and His Vocation

I wanted to spend some time looking at Christian engagement in culture and the arts, and naturally, I turned to C. S. Lewis to see what he might have to say on the matter. In his article, "Christianity and Culture," he explores whether Christians ought to be involved in producing culture in the first place. In response … Continue reading C. S. Lewis in Defense of Culture and His Vocation

When the World Says “Move”, Part 3 — The Scholarly Scribe

Just wanted to share this thoughtful post on the difference between loving, judging, and condemning:   Welcome back for the third and final part of this weekly series. In Part 1 I took a look at a quote from Marvel’s Civil War series and how certain aspects of it can be interpreted as relevant to … Continue reading When the World Says “Move”, Part 3 — The Scholarly Scribe

What Writing Can Tell Us About God

It sounds audacious, but it is largely the premise of Dorothy L. Sayers' The Mind of the Maker. Because writers, like other artists, are "sub-creators," they can give us a unique perspective on the Creator Himself, which can simplify questions of how one can make good and evil, and how miracle, free will, and the Trinity might … Continue reading What Writing Can Tell Us About God

Should Christian Novels Should Be Different?

As Patrick from patrick's thoughts reminded me in his comments on my initial post on writing as a Christian, Christian authors have a standard to uphold. We cannot approach novel writing just as non-Christian novelists do. 1 John 1:6 says, "If we say we have fellowship with Him while we walk in darkness, we lie and … Continue reading Should Christian Novels Should Be Different?